Arranged by Wayne Land - Available For Purchase

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“A Swingin’ Safari”

An instrumental composed by Bert Kaempfert (using his alias, Bernd Bertie) in 1962. It was recorded by Kaempfert on Polydor Records and released in the United States on Decca Records, but failed to chart. That same year, Billy Vaughn recorded it, and his cover reached number 13 on the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and number five on the Easy Listening chart that summer.  This arrangement follows his version fairly close and includes optional Bass Guitar and Drum Set parts.  The soprano sax is perfect for recreating the organ lead part and also gets a chance to improvise near the end.

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“RUNAWAY”

A number-one Billboard Hot 100 song made famous by Del Shannon in 1961. It was written by Shannon and keyboardist Max Crook, and became a major international hit.  It is No. 472 on Rolling Stone's list of the 500 Greatest Songs of All Time, compiled in 2010.  This tune works surprisingly well as a saxophone quartet and has been very well received by audiences.   The soprano sax provides the perfect emulation of the organ solo and near the end also does some improvisation.  Drum Set and Bass Guitar parts are included but are strictly optional.

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“Darktown Strutters’ Ball”

Composed by Shelton Brooks.  Soon after its 1917 publication, "Darktown Strutters' Ball" was included by Sophie Tucker in her Vaudeville routine. The song was recorded on May 9 that year by the Six Brown Brothers. The best-known recording by the Original Dixieland Jazz Band, which was recorded on May 30, 1917, and released by Columbia Records was inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame in 2006.  This arrangement for saxophone quartet will keep your toes tapping all day long.  The sax quartet is a perfect venue for this music.

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“Beale Street Blues”

By American composer and lyricist W.C. Handy. It was named after Beale Street, a center of African-American music in Memphis, Tennessee, and was published in 1917.  "Beale Street Blues" "juxtaposes the 12-bar blues form with an 8-bar counter-theme".  Like many of Handy's songs, it is a hybrid of the blues style with the popular ballad style of the day; the opening lyrics follow a line pattern typical of Tin Pan Alley songs and the later stanzas give way to the traditional three-line pattern characteristic of the blues.  So get out your blues shoes and let this arrangement speak to your audience.

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“Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy”

A major hit song for The Andrews Sisters and an iconic World War II tune. The song is ranked No.6 on Songs of the Century. Bette Midler's 1972 recording of the song reached the top ten on the U.S. pop singles chart.  "Boogie Woogie Bugle Boy" was nominated for the Academy Award for Best Original Song but lost out to "The Last Time I Saw Paris".

The song is closely based on an earlier Raye-Prince hit, "Beat Me Daddy, Eight to the Bar," which is about a virtuoso boogie-woogie piano player.  This arrangement is based on the Andrews Sisters version.  Includes optional bass guitar and drum parts.  The sustained chords near the end just represent an improvised tenor solo.

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“hello Young Lovers”

A show tune from the 1951 Rodgers and Hammerstein musical, The King and I. It is sung by Anna, played by Gertrude Lawrence in the original Broadway production and then a major hit for Frank Sinatra.  This waltz version was inspired by the arranging style of Count Basie who recorded it in 4/4 time.  Includes optional parts for Bass Guitar and Drums.  If your quartet ever plays for dancing, this one will be an important addition to your set list.

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“Sir Duke”

Composed and performed by Stevie Wonder, from his 1976 album Songs in the Key of Life. Released as a single in 1977, the track topped the U.S. Billboard Hot 100 and Black Singles charts, and reached number two in the UK Singles Chart, his joint biggest hit there at the time. Billboard ranked it as the No. 18 song of 1977.

The song was written in tribute to Duke Ellington, the influential jazz legend who had died in 1974. The lyrics also refer to Count Basie, Glenn Miller, Louis Armstrong and Ella Fitzgerald.

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“Superstition”

By Stevie Wonder and released on October 24, 1972, as the lead single from his fifteenth studio album, Talking Book (1972), by Tamla.  The lyrics describes popular superstitions and their negative effects.

"Superstition" reached number one in the U.S. and number one on the soul singles chart. It was Wonder's first number-one single since "Fingertips, Pt. 2", and topped the Billboard Hot 100 in 1973.  This arrangement for Sax Quartet reflects the original song very effectively.

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“Tequila!”

A 1958 Latin-flavored rock and roll instrumental written by Daniel Flores and recorded by the Champs. "Tequila" became a #1 hit on both the pop and R&B charts at the time of its release and continues to be strongly referenced in pop culture to this day.  This chart has been a staple and consistent crowd pleaser.  Don’t miss this one.

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“Sail Along Silv’ry Moon!”

Billy Vaughn and his orchestra made quite a success in the 60’s using two saxophones harmonizing the melody of tunes supported by a shuffle boogie style rhythm section.  It was almost a “given” that I would arrange this for saxophone quartet.  “Sail Along Silv’ry Moon” is a perfect example of the style.  The chart is quite easy to play but should find it’s way into the repertoire of even the more accomplished quartets as well, just because it’s so much fun to play and audiences that remember the 60’s will really “dig it.”

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Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

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“Do You Know What It Means To Miss New Orleans?”

After living there a number of years, I definitely understand the motivation for this song and was proud to contribute my own version for Saxophone Quartet.  I tried to capture the spirit of the music of one of the most unique cities in the world.  If you haven’t already, try and see the movie “New Orleans” with numerous onscreen performances by Louis Armstrong with Billie Holiday and Woody Herman.  This song is featured throughout the film.  Enjoy!

Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

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“Puttin’ On The Ritz”

A spirited rendition of this classic ragtime style tune for Sax Quartet. Drums and Bass parts are included but are totally optional. Not overly difficult but does need careful attention to articulation and expression marks. Really captures the spirit of the roaring 20's. Your audience will love this one.

Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

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“Alexander’s Ragtime Band”

The penultimate ragtime tune written for saxophone quartet.  Some difficult passages but well worth the rehearsal time to nail it down.  Irving Berlin at his best.

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Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

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“A-B-C”

One of the biggest hits from The Jackson Five’s early days.  An ingenious use of rhythm and harmony makes this work really well as a saxophone quartet.  Great nostalgia for audiences that remember the days when the most successful family singing group was at the top of the charts.

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“Such A Night”

Can a Saxophone Quartet do Elvis?  Absolutely, especially this swing tune which was later recorded by the Neville Brothers with a few lyric changes that turned it into a Christmas Song.  Grab your blue suede shoes and take this tune for a spin any time of the year.

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Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

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“Waitin’ For The Robert E. Lee”

Outstanding treatment of this old tyme song highly reflective of the nostalgia around river boats and the era when they were the dominant means of transportation up and down the Mississippi.   There’s a section for open solos, key changes, jazz fills and more.  Drums and Bass really flesh out the sound but the chart works just fine without them.

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Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

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“Winelight”

Originally written by William Eaton and recorded by the great sax artist, Grover Washington, Jr., this legendary tune works super nice as a sax quartet.  The arrangement was conceived with drums and a crucial bass guitar part, but just in case you’d like to play it with just the four saxes, an alternated Bari. part is included that carries the bass line nicely.

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Click the small triangle “play button” to hear the entire arrangement.  

Click “View Score” to preview and/or purchase from Sheet Music Plus.